History of the Albany  Bulb

The Albany Bulb was a privately operated construction debris landfill from 1963 to 1983. The landfill contains demolished houses and highways and because it was never completely capped with soil you can see rebar, lane striping, steel slag, and bathroom tile amidst the rubble. After the landfill closed, many kind of plants, mostly non-native, colonized the site.  Following traditions established in the 1970s and 1980s at the Emeryville mudflats, artists used materials from the landfill and driftwood to make sculptures and they created paintings on the large pieces of concrete and on flotsam that washed ashore.  The Bulb became very popular with dogwalkers, who also enjoy adjacent Albany Beach, a sandy beach that emerged when the projecting landfill trapped sand carried by bay currents.  The beach also became a prime kiteboarding spot.  Because the Bulb was isolated and yet close to urban areas, homeless people established encampments here.  A number of the squatters lived continuously at the Bulb for years at a time and the community built amenities such as trails, a small library, and benches.  For much of the time, the various users of the Bulb maintained a live-and-let-live attitude, and the community of squatters, dogwalkers, fisherpeople, birdwatchers, and artists co-existed in the space.  However, at several points in history when the population of squatters became large, conflicts and sanitation issues arose.

In 2002 the Eastshore State Park was established along the waterfront from the Bay Bridge to Richmond.  A series of public land acquisitions sought to tie together existing city and regional parks such as Cesar Chavez Park in Berkeley and Pt. Isabel Regional Shoreline with additional parkland to be owned by the California State Department of Parks.  In this plan, the Albany Bulb was to be transferred from the City of Albany to the State Parks system.  The officially approved park plan requires the removal of the art and hazards such as the rebar and rubble that had served as art materials.  In 1999 and again in 2014 the encampments were removed and 

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